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new treatment for neuropathy

Nerve Pain After Chemotherapy Reduced After Calmare Scrambler Therapy

February 20, 2019

pain treatment after chemo

Kudos to our patients who aren’t phased by the approaching snow event this week.

Their nearby hotels will bring them to/from our clinic and we’ll keep the doors open to treat everyone, rest assured.

We are increasingly welcoming more people battling nerve pain after chemotherapy treatment. (This neuropathy generally scoffs at traditional pain medication).

Very, very uplifting for us to see these patients mobile and smiling again.

Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy or CIPN is caused by the heavy metals in the these medications which strive to eradicate cancer cells, but may also cause significant nerve damage in the process.

The after-effects of chemo can be life-saving, most assuredly, but can later diminish the patient’s quality of life with resulting nerve pain.

Symptoms of CIPN

If you have peripheral neuropathy, you may notice some of these sensations in your hands or feet:

  • Tingling (or a “pins and needles”)
  • Burning or hot sensation under your skin
  • Numbness or weakness
  • Regionalized or full-body pain
  • Reduced sensation to hot and cold temps
  • Chronic Cramping (mostly in the lower extremities)

Studies show that as many as 50 percent of chemo patients suffer from CIPN, a tremendously painful condition that is famously difficult to treat with traditional medication, most commonly Cymbalta, Lyrica, or Gabapentin, and standard pain management strategies.

It can also reduce the quality of life due to chronic tingling and numbness in the hands and feet.  Mobility and other essential activities of daily living can become impossible.

Calmare’s Electronic Stimulation Proven to Reduce Chemo Nerve Pain

That’s why the news from several studies, including the University of Wisconsin, the Massey Cancer Institute, and the Mayo Clinic are so important.

National Institute of Health Reports on Scrambler Therapy study with CIPN patients.

These centers’ studies have confirmed that Calmare’s scrambler therapy is producing significantly positive results in minimizing or even eliminating pain from chemotherapy treatment.

“The FDA cleared the Calmare MC-5A device specifically to treat patients

with neuropathy as a result of chemotherapy,” says Dr. Michael Cooney.

“We have treated patients with CIPN since 2011 and have seen

dramatically positive outcomes firsthand.”

Calmare scrambler therapy to combat pain from CRPS and nerve pain after chemo.

These findings, reported by top U.S. cancer centers, serve as a light at the end of a long, dark tunnel of pain for our friends, family and colleagues living with the painful after-effects of chemotherapy treatment.

Live, No Cost Consultation with Dr. Cooney

We welcome you to contact us to learn more about using scrambler therapy as a non-invasive, painless treatment for nerve pain after cancer treatment. Our clinical director and founder, Dr. Michael Cooney, speaks personally with any potential Calmare patient.

Scrambler therapy is not right for everyone, and we will not recommend treatment unless Dr. Cooney determines there is a strong probability of pain relief for the patient.

Calmare is non-invasive, has no side effects and is 100% drug-free.

Nelia describes her Calmare Therapy to lessen CIPN

Fill out the info card below and we’ll reach out to you.

Or, feel free to call the clinic at (201) 933-4440 and speak with our friendly and knowledgeable Calmare team.

Featured post

My position on Ketamine for the treatment of CRPS and RSD

By Dr. Michael Cooney, Clinical Director, Calmare Therapy NJ

KetamineOver the past few years, a significant percentage of the RSD / CRPS /fibromyalgia patients I treated had previously undergone Ketamine Infusion Therapy.  I’d like to offer a little background on Ketamine and share some feedback from my patients who used it in various forms—through IV, creams and even as a form of coma-inducing sedation.

For RSD, CRPS and fibromyalgia sufferers, Ketamine is sometimes recommended for temporary chronic pain relief. It is an NMDA blocker that shuts down pain signals coming from the brain and then reboots the brain without the pain signal.

Successful outcome statistics for RSD patients treated with Ketamine are less than 50%. Boosters are necessary every two – three months and the cost averages about $2,000/ treatment. Each IV infusion takes about four to five hours.

Patients sometimes experience significant and unpleasant side effects from this drug, including hallucinations, nausea, extreme fatigue, mental confusion, substantial weight-gain and ‘claw hand’ syndrome.

Criteria to undergo Calmare scrambler therapy after Ketamine treatment

If you have undergone Ketamine treatment without a successful outcome, you can undergo Calmare (assuming your medical condition is determined appropriate for treatment). However, there must be a full two-month span between the last Ketamine treatment and the start of Calmare.

In fact, the less neurolytic drugs (Lyrica, Neurontin, Cymbalta) patients are using during Calmare Therapy, the better. Why? Because these drugs have an effect on brain activity and conflict with the functionality of Calmare to optimally do its job.

In other words, you need to feel your body’s untreated pain in order to identify when the scrambler therapy is lessening the neuropathy, for how long and to what degree.

I realize that for patients who have been reliant on neurolytic drugs for months or years, reducing the dosage of medication before our treatment starts can be daunting. My argument is that the potential rewards for patients who undergo Calmare Therapy may eliminate the need for these expensive and debilitating drugs.  Permanently.

Therefore, I believe this is a gamble worth pursuing.

Every patient’s case is unique because we all react to injury and pain, acute or chronic, in different ways. If you or a loved one is interested in learning more about Calmare Therapy, please feel free to contact me directly at (201) 933-444-zero.

Calmare Scrambler Therapy vs. Full Body RSD

March 23, 2013

woman in shadow anonymousMelissa, age 28, arrived here from south Jersey for Calmare treatment on Wednesday after suffering from full body RSD for 15 long years. The original injury began in her left ankle after a fall, followed by a second injury as the result of a car accident.  Over the years, her RSD slowly spread until it encompassed her entire body.

She and her husband aggressively sought new pain treatments for RSD ─ a laundry list of drugs, spinal cord stimulators (SCS),  multiple nerve blocks, etc.  Melissa was searching on the Internet for drug-free treatments and discovered one of our patient stories on YouTube. She contacted us and we talked at length about her medical history, treatment efforts and expectations. I shared my experience treating many people living with RSD / CRPS/ RND / Fibromyalgia using Calmare, and we mutually decided to begin treatment.

My strategy is to initiate treatment exclusively on her original pain site, the left ankle. After the first treatment, her Mother became emotional saying the early results were the first positive treatment outcome she could remember.

After Treatment Day 3 (yesterday), Melissa described her pain as “sore” but far from the 8 -10 level reported a few days ago. She noted both arms are receding in pain.

Time will tell. Her case is very advanced and has been in place for more than a decade. As I’ve said before, the longer the period of sustained neuropathy, the longer the treatment process can be. Have I seen exceptions to this guideline? Yes, absolutely. But this is typical.

Melissa’s early positive early signs are encouraging to me.  Her mother is staying here in town with her for week one and her husband will come up for week two. With her permission, I’ll keep you updated on her progress.

Good weekend to all,

Dr. Cooney

Seventy-years-old is NOT too old for Calmare scrambler therapy

old man's handMarch 12, 2013

I received a query from a senior male asking if he was  “too old”  to undergo Calmare Pain Therapy Treatment. After reviewing his medical history and discussing previous therapies and medications used, I learned that he underwent hand surgery two years ago and endured post surgical pain ever since. His pain eventually resulted in a CRPS diagnosis from his doctor.  He said even in chronic pain, he was still able to drive, but the pain level was increasing progressively and side effects from his prescribed pain medication was making him feel unsteady on his feet and “cranky”.

He is from Monmouth County here in New Jersey. When we met last month, I was surprised to learn that this gentleman was living every day of his long-awaited retirement with an 8/9 pain level.

His neuropathy was concentrated in a very specific area of the hand, so placement of the Calmare leads was relatively direct. After five one-hour treatments, his pain was consistently a 3/4. Much to his delight, he no longer needs to use Gabapentin (Neurontin) which caused ongoing dizziness, emotional confusion and depression.

This isn’t the first senior who has experienced a positive outcome with scrambler therapy and (I hope) it won’t be the last. If you or a loved one is suffering their senior years in pain, I’d be happy to talk with you. Here’s to more happy endings down the road.

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