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Charles Osgood reports on Mayo Clinic Calmare Trial

TheOsgoodFileThe highly regarded journalist Charles Osgood, author of the  long-running Osgood File, reported on a new clinical trial at Mayo Clinic featuring a woman who battled cancer with chemotherapy. Unfortunately, the treatment left her with a severe chronic pain condition called chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (chronic pain) or CIPN.

The patient, Karen, had pain that was so severe she could barely walk.

She heard about a new treatment for chronic pain called scrambler therapy being offered at the Mayo Clinic and signed up. Once cleared for the trial, Karen began daily Calmare treatments, which are pain-free and have no side effects.

During the interview with Osgood, Karen reported that  Calmare started working after the very first treatment. After four treatments, the pain she had endured for more than a decade was gone.

“It wasosgood so incredible that I hadn’t felt pain-free for so many years that I guess I didn’t expect it to last,” Karen says during the interview.

More than a year after her treatment, she continues to be pain-free.

Oregonian mother and daughter travel 3,000 miles for scrambler therapy in New Jersey

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And we are pleased to say it was well worth their long journey.

Laurie Mounts during treatment
Laurie undergoing pain-free Calmare Therapy treatment which has no side effects. July 2014.

Laurie Mounts was injured in 2008 and later diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome  (CRPS). When she presented at Calmare Therapy NJ in early July 2014, her pain level was a 9/10 on her entire left side from her feet up to the shoulder.

Laurie Mounts Legs before
Laurie exhibited classic CRPS symptoms including skin discoloration.

Laurie’s symptoms includes discoloration (see image at left), allodynia, numbness, tingling, sweats, swelling, burning and brittle hair.

Before discovering scrambler therapy, Laurie and her family had aggressively sought out several pain relief treatments including physical therapy, prescription medications and, ultimately, the implantation of a spinal cord stimulator ( SCS ).

Ultimately, these chronic pain treatment efforts for CRPS were not successful.

Due to an eventual increase in pain levels, Laurie was bedridden much of her life and relied on sleep medications for the very limited amount of sleep she was able to achieve.

This lovely young woman and her dedicated family persevered, nonetheless.

We are delighted to share their video diary here.

Determined father discovers Calmare Therapy to overcome daughter’s CRPS

May 2, 2014

It’s Kara stompFriday, a perfect day to share some good news:  The Stomp family kindly allowed us to share the positive outcome of their teenage daughter,who arrived here in a wheelchair due to severe CRPS after knee surgery four years ago. Kara is a lovely person with a loving family who would not give up a 4-year fight to find a solution to their daughter’s pain.

Background:

At age 14, Kara was diagnosed with CRPS after surgery for a dislocated kneecap. She spent the next four years undergoing painful, invasive and ultimately unsuccessful pain treatment efforts. By age 18, Kara was wheelchair-bound and living with CRPS symptoms including skin lesions, swelling, discoloration, allodynia and temperature change sensitivity. But her unrelenting father was determined to help his daughter and through his research, discovered Calmare scrambler therapy. Click here to learn more about their experience . 

CIPN patient shares her experience with Calmare Therapy

February 15, 2012 – Amsterdam

(reprinted with patient permission)

A Letter from Nelia B (Condition: CIPN after Chemo Taxol Therapy)

For the past 2 1/2 years, I’ve been suffering from severe CIPN in my feet, after undergoing Taxol therapy for breast cancer. Three months after finishing the chemo, the neuropathy got much worse. Since then I’ve been on a high dose of pain medication (Gabapentin, Venlafaxine, Tramadol). Still my pain kept being at a level between 5 to 10. I also tried morphine patches, two painful and unsuccessful nerve blocks, cortisone injections, acupuncture, tens treatments and vitamin B12 shots. Nothing helped.

My doctors told me that my CIPN was chronic and not much else could be done about it. Meanwhile, I kept researching options and read about the clinical trials for CIPN with “Calmare Therapy” at the Massey Cancer Center, as well as at the University of Wisconsin (UW) Carbone Center. The doctors at both institutions told me that they experienced positive outcomes. I was also able to talk to a patient who underwent Calmare treatment, which was encouraging also. Then in the fall of 2011, I learned that the US Military opened several Calmare centers.

In December 2011, I decided to give it a try and contacted Dr. Cooney at the Rutherford Allied Medical Group in the United States. Afraid of being disappointed, I was a skeptical patient. But after the first treatment, my feet felt relaxed and I could sense a slight relief. Thereafter, I got better with every treatment and started cutting down the pain medication. After 10 treatments I was on 10% pain medication and the pain was at level 3 to 5. When I returned home the pain slightly increased, but then it stabilized. Although I am not pain free, I feel so much better.

The Calmare treatment has given me back some quality of live, I did not have in three years. I’ve much more energy, my head is clear–being on much less medication–and I feel hopeful! It’s great to be on the street and look down the block, knowing that I can actually walk there; it is even better that I can finally take my children to the playground. My family is very relieved seeing me feeling better.

I’m very grateful to have found the Rutherford Allied Medical Group in New Jersey. Thank you Dr. Cooney and Dr. Michel for the wonderful care!

If you suffer from CIPN, you absolutely should give it a try. Good luck!

Nelia B.

Melissa finds Calmare Therapy from an RSD Facebook Friend

Here’s a wonderful example of social media helping people living with chronic pain and other difficult-to-treat conditions. Melissa from Michigan subscribed to a group on Facebook for people living with RSD (reflux sympathetic disorder). Someone with an aggressive case of RSD and fibromyalgia posted about Dr. Cooney and Calmare Pain Therapy as a treatment that finally relieved her chronic pain after years of fruitless medications and invasive procedures.

After asking questions (“Can you perform the therapy even though I have a spinal cord stimulator?’) and talking personally with Dr.  Cooney about her condition and other therapies she had tried, she made the trek to New Jersey. Melissa shares her inspiring story here.

New U. of Wisconsin study supports Calmare for CIPN treatment

More and more cancer patients are surviving the disease but suffer with debilitating pain as a result of chemotherapy treatment, particularly in the feet and hands. The nerve damage can affect the patient’s ability to walk and use their hands. But an NBC News affiliate broadcast this new report on October 11 about a new  clinical study by the University of Wisconsin which determined Calmare’s MC-5A scrambler therapy is the first known therapy to show measurable results in helping to alleviate CIPN pain. “This technology has consistently shown very impressive results in our blind study, ” reports Toby Campbell, MD, chief of Palliative Medicine, University of Wisconsin.

As a result, a larger more extensive study has been approved. For anyone interested in participating in the study at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, call 800-622-8922.

Dr. Michael J. Cooney

Rutherford Allied Medical Group

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