trialsAdd another upcoming university-based, clinical research study about Calmare scrambler therapy to the list:

In addition to Johns Hopkins, Mayo Clinic, Massey Cancer Institute and others, BYU researchers will be conducting its own scrambler therapy study.

Dr. David Busath, heading up the research at Brigham Young University, stated, “I think the fooling the brain idea is a 1024px-BYU_Medallion_Logo.svglegitimate one…we’re convincing the brain in one area that this other area shouldn’t be hyperactive after all.”

Dr. Busath’s study protocol will consist of taking a patient  MRI for 20 minutes, then performing Calmare for 30 minutes, followed by another MRI.

Calmare provider and pain therapist Erick Bingham, not affiliated with the BYU study, stated in the article that the successful outcome for scrambler therapy patients depends on how the individual reacts after the very first treatment and believes patient response early on can be a predictor of the outcome. He says that 80 percent of the time, if the patient sustains a reduction in pain after that first treatment, they’re going to be a good candidate.

Dr. Bingham accurately noted that some patients will require periodic booster treatments while others remain pain-free with no need for future treatment.

Read the full article here

BYU scrambler therapy study candidates must have constant sharp pain in the hands or feet and not be on any anti-convulsant medication. Additionally, participants cannot have stents, pacemakers or other implants that would interfere with an MRI scan. Those wishing to apply for the two-phase study can contact Dr. Busath’s office at 801-422-8753.

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