By Dr. Michael J. Cooney

It is one of the great frustrations of healthcare–pain.  And, often, those who suffer the most live every moment of every day in pain. This could not be more true for cancer patients who have endured chemotherapy in order to eradicate the cancer from their bodies. Often, the chemo is successful and the patient’s cancer is in remission. But these “soldiers against cancer” are often left with a weakened, damaged body as a result of the powerful after-affects of the drugs.

This condition, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, called CIPN, has no real cure. There are pain killing drugs (more drugs) of course, along with a few alterative therapies can help alleviate some of the pain. But there is no cure for CIPN.

That’s why the news from several studies underway, including the University of Wisconsin, as well as the Mayo Clinic (3/4 way through this video, Dr. Charles Loprinzi discusses the scrambler therapy study which they have in progress now 11.2011)  are so important. These centers’ studies are finding that Calmare’s scrambler therapy is producing significantly positive results in minimizing or even eliminating pain from chemotherapy treatment. These findings, starting to filter in from our country’s most respected cancer centers, serve as a light at the end of a long, dark tunnel of pain for our friends, family and colleagues living with the painful after-effects of chemotherapy treatment.

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